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Getting your Office Started

Starting a small business in a bad economy is not an easy task; you have to rent office space, buy furniture and supplies, hire a staff or support, and the list goes on and on. There are a few things you’ll need to ask yourself before setting up your location, like budget, leasing and the necessities to get going. Here are some things to consider:

Budgeting – Owning your own business comes with a host of expenses; advertising costs, business tools & software, and mostly your time. These costs are associated with both a home-based business, as well as an office space. Like personal budgeting, if you’re deciding to allocate business expenses towards an office, you may need to cut costs elsewhere. Before deciding if an office is right for you, determine how much money your company is making on a monthly basis and how much money you are using for your own personal finances. If you cannot determine a steady number, then you may not be ready to own an office space.

Purchase or Lease – Commercial real estate may not be something you have a lot of experience in, but knowing what you want out of a property is key. Commercial real estate is very similar to residential when it comes to location. With a business location, however, location can actually make or break your business. Are you too close to your competition? Are you in an area that needs your products and services? Another important decision you need to make is whether you want to lease or to buy. If your budget and credit line are already tight, you may want to lease for a few years to save up.

Office Supplies and Furniture – This is one area you need to be very tight on, since office supplies and furniture can be an unfixed monthly cost. Furnishing an office can be an extreme undertaking and can blow your budget very quickly. Buy only what you immediately need, since an over-furnished office may look empty and unappealing to customers or clients. Office tools and supplies are also tricky, since you want durable, long-lasting products, but you’re on a budget. This is where you’ll want to prioritize your purchases. Does your company have lots of meetings and brainstorming sessions? Then spring for a glass dry erase board that will last you for three or four times what a regular whiteboard would. And maybe your company runs best on e-mails and electronic communication, so utilize those free tools instead of paying for a fax line and the upkeep of a machine.

About Clarus Glassboards: Clarus is the leading manufacturer and innovator of glass whiteboards and glass visual display products. For more information about clear dry erase boards and our other glass architectural systems, please call 888-813-7414 or visit www.clarusglassboards.com.